open-source liturgy

Project London (Wired UK 07/11 p80) is a movie about aliens escaping their dying planet and inhabiting earth. Joint command, a military organisation comprising humans and ‘Nalardians’ rules the population with an iron fist… It sounds like any other Hollywood blockbuster except this film has a practically non existent budget.

The film’s 780 computer generated effects have been provided by open-sourced contributions. A team of 12 was assembled from a collection of vetted contributors most of whom have never met Ian Hubert the director who has relied extensively on email.

Now, I know much of church life is run by committee and vetted personnel but I wonder if we could create more innovative material if we used open-sourced contributions from people all over the world? Liturgy is a particular focus of my thoughts at the minute and having engaged with some excellent services over the summer I got to thinking about how all this material could be shared, improved, tried and tested?

Perhaps the rules on ‘legal’ liturgy could be relaxed in some denominations and those with a less liturgical tradition might like to try some? nevertheless, open-source working and collaboration is a definite must for the future of liturgy and the wider work of the church.

In my last post I mentioned the 1000 premieres project – they are looking for volunteers if you happen to be in the US and available during filming / post production.

Questions to think about

  • how can the church incorporate more collaborative working?
  • how can open-sourced material realistically be vetted and who should do it?
  • how can we encourage clergy to experiment more with liturgy?
  • how can less liturgically based traditions input to the discussion?
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